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3 days in Naples/Pompeii

If you didn’t already know, this month is dedicated partly to travel. I’m trying my hand at travel blogging and taking you through the different legs of our trip last month, detailing as much as I can remember about what we did, the costs and our overall experiences. You can catch up on our Prague adventure HERE, and now we’re talking about destination number 2 – Naples.

As with Prague, day one was very much a travel day. We got our flight from Prague to Naples (which lasted about 2 hours) in the morning and we arrived into Naples airport at about 11am. We got an airport bus to the central station, which was easy enough to find from within the airport, and actually ended up missing our stop, otherwise it would’ve been very easy. The unfamiliarity of our surroundings, the stress and the fact I hadn’t eaten yet all got too much and I had a panic attack on the floor after we got off the bus. Not fun. Max and I also argued the whole way to the apartment and the whole situation really sucked. We ended up getting the metro from the port back to central station and then got the train from there, so it was a lot easier than we both acted like it was.

On our second day, we went to go into Pompeii but ended up being hounded on the street and shoved onto a bus up to Vesuvius for 20 euros each (rip off, do research instead and find a cheaper shuttle bus up to Vesuvius if you can). We did want to climb Vesuvius anyway, but we hoped we could do it much cheaper or on another day so we didn’t feel too overwhelmed. We were advised to do Vesuvius in the morning, which would take 2 and a half hours, and Pompeii in the afternoon, but we found we didn’t have enough time in Pompeii to see everything. The walk from the bus stop up to Vesuvius is really tough but so worth the climb, the view from the top on a clear day is amazing and it’s really crazy to be stood on a volcano that isn’t extinct yet. Make sure to take plenty of water and keep hydrated, and wear sensible shoes because the path is pretty sandy and unstable, it’s easy to slip and you’ll get red sand/dust all over your shoes.

There are water fountains all around Pompeii, which is a godsend, and I would advise filling up every time you see one because before you know it, you’re out of water and there’s not a fountain in sight. We decided not to get a guided tour, and I think we would’ve had a better experience if we had because we weren’t really sure what we were looking at. It was crazy to see though, completely amazing and humbling. I’ve always found Pompeii fascinating, and Max and I both completely loved the experience.

We went into Naples on day three, where we visited the Modern Art Gallery. I actually loved it in there, because of all the fun photo ops. Modern art is much more entertaining than paintings. I didn’t like Naples very much, to be honest, and was thankful we decided to base ourselves in Pompeii instead. I didn’t feel very safe outwith the main, busy tourist areas and kept having to look out for shit on the street so my trainers didn’t get ruined.

We walked over to the Piazza del Plebiscito in the afternoon and sat there for a little bit, taking photos and having a chat in the sunshine, then walked over to Castel Nuovo. To make sure I didn’t feel too anxious, we decided to head back to Pompeii for dinner. I am glad we visited though; it would’ve been silly to miss out on it given the fact that we were staying so close, but I would definitely recommend staying somewhere else and just travelling in for a day. That definitely suited me better.

We weren’t quite sure what to do on our last day, we would’ve loved a beach day or a day exploring the Amalfi Coast, but the weather didn’t look like it was gonna pan out in our favour. We ended up going back into Pompeii; we were there pretty much all day and we still didn’t see everything. It’s probably worth doing at least 1 if not 2 full days in Pompeii – I have no idea how people manage to see everything in there, because we kept getting lost as all the buildings kinda look the same. Probably people who are sensible and get a guide.

Pompeii was very much a bucket list thing for both Max and myself, and we’re so glad we did it, even if we didn’t get to see everything there. A top tip for visiting Pompeii is definitely to bring bug repellent and use it religiously – I was bitten to absolute shreds in Pompeii (Prague as well, but the worst and most amount of bites came from Pompeii) and my body doesn’t react well. If you read my What I Wore On Holiday post, you’ll know on this day I wore trousers. My ankles were covered in bites that swelled and went red – my ankle was swollen and one of the bites turned into a huge blister that I had to get fixed when I got home. It was so gross and probably avoidable if you’re prepared, so take lots and lots of preventative measures.

The food, as expected, was incredible and I will be dreaming about the carbonara I had for years to come. Tap water was totally safe to drink here and we kept water in the fridge or freezer so it was nice and cold for us to go out during the day, just watch out for the condensation if you’re gonna put the bottle in your bag or anything. Max and I both knew some basic Italian words but mostly everyone spoke English, so communication was no problem.

I loved this leg of the holiday; I definitely felt more comfortable in Italy than Prague, given I knew more Italian words and preferred the food over there. Also I’m now obsessed with Aperol Spritz and never want to drink anything else ever again.

Have you ever visited Naples?

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